TSUBO – Men’s Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

By - August 17th, 2011

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

Unlike any things else when it came on the market in 1997, TSUBO altered the footwear market at the time with its thoughtfully executed designs. Thanks to its co-founder Nick O’Rorke and Partrick McNulty, along with lessons learned during their tenures at Reebok, TSUBO‘s application of performance attributes to traditional silhouettes quickly had it curved out a sizable market share. This was mainly due to the fact no other labels had the expertise in both. After the label was sold to Deckers Outdoor Corporation, owner of UGG and TEVA, TSUBO underwent a few restructuring changes with a new initiative in the re-introduction of its original tenet, classic appearances with modern sophistication. Leading the change are the Wexler shoes and the Winslow boots. Both exemplified traditional stylings in the applications of brogue and burnish leather. Take it apart, however, you will find technical amenities like 3D Spacer lining for optimal breathability and shock absorbing dual density foam inserts. Most apparent of this retro-modern mashup is the outsole, where distinctive rubber outsoles layered with a harden leather midsole, best of 2 worlds.

Both the Wexler and the Winslow are now available at select retail locations along with the company’s online store.

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

TSUBO   Mens Fall/Winter 2011 | Wexler + Winslow

3 comments
Al
Al

then they wouldn't be tsubo...

boomba
boomba

all these would look so much better without that ankle strap

BradWhelan
BradWhelan

Disagree entirely. That little detail is what adds to the Wexler's uniqueness.